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Shell and tube heat exchangers, hydraulic cylinders, components & hydraulic systems, gas springs : Quiri

Gas spring

The gas spring, sometimes referred to as “gas strut” or “gas shock”, consists of a cylindrical steel body containing a compressed gas (nitrogen) and a rod/piston sliding in a guide ring.

Gas springs exert pressure on the rod/piston, which is guided by a ring in a sealed chamber. This pressure creates the required thrust force in the press tool.

Unlike pneumatic or hydraulic cylinders, they do not require external energy. Thanks to pre-inflation, they operate autonomously.

GAS SPRING APPLICATIONS

Gas springs are used in many industries. Since the 1970s, car manufacturers have been the primary users, with gas struts being used in all car tailgates.

Industrial engineers have subsequently given the gas spring many additional applications : furniture doors, protective casing for industrial machinery, or in moulds for the plastics industry for example.

The industrial gas spring is also widely used in stamping press tools. In this application, it takes action in the kinematics of the tool to create the forces on the blank holders.

ADVANTAGES OF GAS SPRINGS

The gas spring has many advantages in any application :

  • It is more compact than the mechanical spring.
  • It has a very long lifespan.
  • It is easy to use.
  • It is easy to fix.
  • It is corrosion resistant.

QUIRI, EXPERT IN THE DESIGN AND MANUFACTURE OF GAS SPRINGS

Quiri Hydromechanics is a specialist in the design and manufacture of industrial hydraulic equipment and components (hydraulic suspensions, snubbers and cylinders, industrial gas springs or even complete systems such as hydraulic test benches or rerailing equipment). With many years of experience, we produce gas struts and are able to offer you the most suitable products for your applications thanks to our extensive range available from stock. For more information, please do not hesitate to contact our experts.


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